Cosmic Evolution Project Submenu Links - click to expand or collapse list

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Universe

origin of the Universe

composition

cosmic web

stardust

supernova

dark-matter-day

Milky Way Galaxy

compact-star

exoplanets

primordial overdensities

Big Bang

Expansion

Early cosmic inflation

protons and neutrons

photons and neutrinos

Stars and Galaxies

Solar System

Sun

Jupiter

Venus

Earth

Moon

Ice Giants

Trans-Neptunian Objects

Asteroid Belt

Moons and Rings

Earth and Geobiosphere

Global Catastrophes

Ocean Science Quest

Darwin In the Garden

Origin of Life

dinosaurs

Diversity of Life

Complexity of Life

virus

bacteria

archaea

eukaryotes

plants

fire

Organism Life Cycle

Ecosystem Evolution

Ecosystem Life Cycle

Brains and Tools

good-or-bad

Brain Structure

Brain Cell Building Blocks

Brain chemistry and neuroplasticity

Brain Development

Brain Evolution

Brain Emergent Properties

Consciousness

Brain Life Cycle

Tools

Tools to expand sensory powers

Tools to expand physical powers

Tools to expand mental powers

Artificial Intelligence

Artificial Selection

Socio-economic Evolution

 

 

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universe

Science seeks plausible natural explanations of natural phenomena. For example: How did a giant cloud of cold dilute gas and dust evolve into astronauts in a spacecraft orbiting a planet orbiting a star? The short answer is when energy flows, complexity grows.

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solar system

The five billion year history of the solar system involves the formation and evolution of the Sun, planets, moons, planetesimals, asteroids, comets, and interplanetary gas and dust. Transformations of energy and matter in the interior of the Sun and planets involve gravitational, electromagnetic and nuclear forces. Heat transport may involve thermal conduction, convection, and radiation.

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Earth and Geobiosphere

The five billion year history of the Earth and geobiosphere is best depicted by a linear timeline in equal 100 million year intervals depicting Earth's physical, chemical, and biological history including changes at major nodes in Blair Hedges molecular timescales. The timeline will be accompanied by plausible explanations of the underlying astrophysical, geophysical, biogeochemical, and ecological causes and/or consequences of molecular and metabolic evolution. The emphasis is on the thermal structure and

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brains and tools

Brains and tools involve the composition, structure, and evolution of neurons and biological and artificial neural networks from the simplest animals to the human brain, their ability to process sensory input and to control motor functions, and the development of tools to analyze, observe, and control the environment and transform the Earth and its lifeforms.

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cosmic evolution project

Sample Project Questions: One focus of this project is to simulate the formation and evolution of natural systems using modeling software like NetLogo in order to provide new insights for researchers and educators addressing questions like the following:

  1. What is the difference between Big Bang Nucleosynthesis and stellar nucleosynthesis?
  2. How did dark matter cosmic webs dissipate excess energy and entropy and where did the excess go?
  3. How do stars and giant planets form and how does energy flow from their interiors?
  4. How do space and particles co-evolve?
  5. Does the expanding universe conserve energy?
  6. How do prebiotic geochemical processes produce the molecular and metabolic building blocks of life?
  7. How do polymers, membranes, self-replicating molecules, and self-organizing structures form?
  8. How do geobiospheres, organisms, and ecosystems co-evolve?
  9. What processes and conditions caused the fungus and animal kingdoms to diverge?
  10. How do biological brains and artificial intelligence co-evolve?

Home

We Want Educators to Explore and Explain the Evolutionary History of the Earth and Universe

The cosmic and global evolution project conducts secondary research on the composition, structure, and evolutionary processes and history of the Earth and the universe from the Big Bang to big brains and artificial intelligence. The project organizes and hosts inspirational special events, designs educational models and games, and maintains a website that supports courses on advanced topics. To learn more about the project purpose and plans visit https://evolution.calpoly.edu/purpose.

The project is affiliated with CESAME, the Center for Engineering, Science, and Mathematics Education which has a webpage at https://cesame.calpoly.edu/cosmic-evolution-project that summarizes opportunities for scientists, educators, and students to participate in our projects. These include secondary research, analysis of simulation data, synthesis based on the principles of thematic interpretation, mentors and interns, design of educational models and games, and multimedia science communication. Part of our about webpage at https://evolution.calpoly.edu/about is based on the CESAME webpage.

We are developing educational resources for courses on advanced topics including the composition, structure, formation, and/or evolution of emergent systems like cosmic webs, galaxies, black holes, stars, planets, life, brains, and/or artificial intelligence. The outline is on the SAGE webpage at https://evolution.calpoly.edu/sage.

Many of the videos embedded in this website are on the Cal Poly Cosmic Evolution YouTube channel which is at https://tinyurl.com/cosmicevolutionyoutube. You may have to click on the uploads button to see thumbnails of all of the videos.

special events

There are several upcoming special events listed in the 2021 accordion below.

The cosmic evolution project sponsors a popular consulting guest speaker in early October in a venue like Spanos Theatre. The project organizes three quarterly faculty-student special events per year: Dark Matter Day near Halloween, Darwin Days in February, and Earth Days in April. Preparation should start at least one quarter before the quarter in which the event or activity occurs. Other events and activities may also be organized.

Our latest talk is called Are viruses good or bad? It was given to 150 freshman biology majors on October 28 via Zoom. Viruses are essential to the origin, evolution, and well being of life on Earth. To view our recorded talk and read more about beneficial viruses, visit our virus page  https://evolution.calpoly.edu/virus.

2021

 

Doomsday for Dinosaurs - a melodrama in four acts

Friday February 26, 2021 at 5 pm PST exclusively at the Gem Theater in Utah, but will be embedded on the dinosaur webpage https://evolution.calpoly.edu/dinosaurs which is under construction. We plan to live stream on Zoom for the public in a month or so because of the pandemic.

This cosmic evolution project originally intended to celebrate the 50th anniversary of Earth Day in April of 2020 with a special student faculty presentation entitled Global Catastrophes and Mass Extinctions on the 4.6 billion year evolutionary history of the Earth's oceans and atmosphere and the mass extinctions caused by factors ranging from asteroids to volcanoes. Part of the story is in the dinosaur show. The more general webpage will be at https://evolution.calpoly.edu/catastrophes. Right now there are 34 topical Wikipedia articles in the last accordion, but nothing else.
 
 

The Evolution of Evolution: Darwin Then and Now

Thursday, Feb 25th at 7 pm

- By Dr. David Reznick

Time: Feb 25, 2021 07:00 PM Pacific Time (US and Canada)

Join Zoom Meeting
https://calpoly.zoom.us/j/88570147898

Dr. David Reznick is a Distinguished Professor from UC Riverside and the 
Director of the Network for Experimental Research on Evolution. 
 “Darwin’s book was misnamed, because it is … not a treatise on the origin of species.” -Ernst Mayr, 1942
Ernst Mayr was one of the foremost evolutionary biologists of the 20th century and a major figure in shaping our modern concept of species and speciation. When I read this quote it distressed me, since I  thought that Darwin wrote about the origin of species. It took me over 20 years to reconcile Darwin and Mayr and to confirm that The Origin of Species was indeed about the origin of species. Doing so means envisioning the Origin’s place in a stream of science. There were concepts of species and speciation before Darwin, but Darwin’s vision forever changed our thinking. The scientists who followed did not see the Origin as a statement of truth, but rather as a challenge to first ask if Darwin was correct, then to study the consequences of what Darwin referred to as “transmutation.” In the process, the theory of evolution evolved, as did our understanding of what a species is and how speciation occurs. Mayr’s statement is a measure of the divide between Darwin’s understanding of speciation in 1859 and Mayr’s in 1942. Evolution has continued to evolve since Mayr. In my talk, I will describe Darwin’s accomplishment, how it departs from his predecessors, and how our understanding of evolution evolved after Darwin.

 

Darwin's birthday was February 12, 1809

In future years, we hope to sponsor special events in person featuring short faculty talks on evolution, guest speakers, and original faculty student events on topics such as the evolution of marine mammals like the elephant seal or even “The Coevolution of Plants and Animals”, highlighting the evolutionary history of life. Topics may include the origin and evolution of molecular and metabolic building blocks of life, energy and entropy, photosynthesis and respiration, and/or relationships among organisms including endosymbiosis, cooperation, and competition.

 

The annual Spanos talk featuring Cal Berkeley astrophysics professor Alex Filippenko originally scheduled for October 5, 2020 has been postponed until 2021 due to the pandemic.

 
 
 

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2020

Are viruses good or bad?

Marine science major Alyse Handley and physicist Bob Field gave this talk to 150 freshman biology majors on October 28 via Zoom. Viruses are essential to the origin, evolution, and well being of life on Earth. Our virus page is under construction at https://evolution.calpoly.edu/virus. The page has a gif illustrating the NetLogo game we designed. The first accordion below the gif has our three part talk on viruses including PowerPoint slides and the game. The subsequent accordion blocks contain almost all of the images from the talk as well as detailed explanations. Two brief YouTube videos by the Amoeba sisters are embedded at the bottom. of the page.

We are stardust

November 2, 2019 talk was repeated for the Central Coast Astronomical Society on March 26 in a special live-stream event watched by 200 people. The recording has been embedded on the stardust webpage at https://evolution.calpoly.edu/stardust.

Darwin Days

On the week of Darwin's birthday, February 12, 2020, we sponsored another special event featuring a series of short faculty talks on evolution and another walk in the Leaning Pine Arboretum.

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2019

On Wednesday October 9, 2019, UC Santa Cruz astrophysics department chair Raja Guha Thakurta gave a talk in Spanos Theatre entitled "The Universe of Galaxies: Dark Matter, Cannibalism, Black Holes, Gravity Waves, and the Periodic Table of Elements".

We thank everyone who made Raja's Spanos talk so successful - 416 attendees !!

On November 2, 2019, our fall faculty-student special event in Baker room 180-101 entitled "We are stardust" explored and explained the cosmic origins of the Periodic Table elements from the Big Bang to exploding stars. We discussed stellar and nuclear astrophysical processes. The talk was given by Bob Field, Jonathan Hood, and Liam Cox.

About 70 attendees celebrated the 50th anniversary of the Apollo Moon missions at our free public lecture “Apollo 10: Fly me to the Moon” on Wednesday May 22 in Baker room 180-101. Speakers included Bob Field and David Kozuch. Highlights included videos and posters of the Apollo 10 and 11 missions, the origin and co-evolution of the Moon and Earth, and the influence of the Moon on life on Earth. Apollo 10 was the dress rehearsal for the Apollo 11 lunar landing. On this date 50 years ago, two astronauts entered the lunar module and descended to within 8.4 miles of the surface of the moon.The flyer and additional information is at https://evolution.calpoly.edu/moon.

 

Darwin Days

We celebrated Darwin's 210th birthday with short talks by biology faculty on February 7 and "Darwin in the Garden: A walk through time" on February 8 in the Leaning Pine arboretum. The effort was led by professors Jenn Yost and Matt Ritter. Visit DarwinDays for more information and to see the flyer.  We have a new walk brochure that you can download: DarwinGardenBrochure. It is designed to be printed on both sides of 11x17 paper, flip on short side, and folded in half twice so that the picture of Darwin is on the front. It may be possible to print it on a smaller paper size if necessary. The original Darwin in the Garden posters from the 2009 bicentennial are at DarwinGarden
 

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2018

In our first year with an endowment, we had two major events, our first Spanos Theatre invited talk was by Amherst College astronomer and exoplanet hunter Kate Follette and our first student faculty event was a six hour open house in Chumash auditorium to celebrate Dark Matter Day on Halloween.

Illustration of planets orbiting a star

How We Find Planets around Other Stars

For detailed information see our webpage https://evolution.calpoly.edu/exoplanets

Dark Matter Day open house

This six hour event was held in Chumash auditorium and included many poster displays, exhibits, a PowerPoint show, and Halloween treats. Visit our webpage for all the information https://evolution.calpoly.edu/dark-matter-day including pictures and a great Q&A section. Many students participated by doing research for credit, through summer internships, by making posters, and by giving poster talks. Researchers included Michael Menhennet, Liam Cox, Nicholas Trautman, Max Milliman, and Scott Pirkle, most of whom gave poster talks at this event or at the Frost symposium. Jonathan Hood and others also spoke.

1998 - 2017

Many talks and poster displays were research and presented over this twenty year period. This section will summarize these early years which included many student projects. The cosmic evolution project has two parents: walks and talks in the local state parks and natural history museum and student senior projects in the Cal Poly physics department. These two came together to form the global evolution project and included an advanced topics course in solar and global evolution, called SAGE. With the addition of astrophysics and cosmology, it evolved into the cosmic evolution project, which is sometimes called the cosmic and global evolution project or CAGE to recognize the roles of the Earth sciences and biological sciences.
 

Darwin's bicentennial, February 12, 2009

This was one of our first special events billed as an evolution event. It included a library poster display and talk and a walk in Leaning Pine Arboretum which provided many of the settings for the poster display.

 

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What is the Cosmic Evolution Project? – click to expand or collapse

The project is a work in progress by Dr. Bob Field, Cal Poly physicist and research scholar in residence. As such, it has not been professionally reviewed by specialists in each and every field that is within its scope and in fact a major goal of going live online is to make the content and format accessible to potential reviewers around the world. So that is the caveat in using this material for research or advanced studies along with the obvious point that references and footnotes have been kept to a minimum to maintain the flow of big ideas.

The new project is an expansion of the Global Evolution Education Project which focuses on the five billion year natural history of planet Earth. This project and other natural history and natural science projects were extensively documented on a faculty website that no longer exists. Many students and a number of faculty have participated in this effort and their activities will be described as this website matures.

The cosmic evolution project provides educational resources to help students, educators, and the general public investigate the composition, structure, formation, and evolution of the universe in four overlapping domains: universe, solar system, Earth and geobiosphere, and brains and tools. The project provides timelines showing the sequence of key events in the evolutionary history of each of these domains.

The project supports upper division undergraduate student projects and courses and informal science education. The story of cosmic evolution involves astrophysical and biogeochemical materials and processes and emphasizes what nature does, not what scientists do. The National Academy of Science says that it is the role of science to provide plausible natural explanations of natural phenomena. That is to say that invoking unknown unobservable supernatural agents and processes is out of scope for a scientific endeavor until all other explanations have been definitively eliminated. And even then, a supernatural explanation would have to meet a set of plausibility criteria above and beyond mere supposition.

Unlike the wonderful Cosmos series on TV, this project focuses on the sequence of natural events themselves, rather than the role of science and scientists in discovering nature’s secrets. Cosmic evolution asks how stars and galaxies and life itself emerged from nothing. The ultimate question in Earth system history is how did a cold dilute cloud of gas and dust evolve into astronauts in a spacecraft orbiting a planet orbiting a star?

Universe – click to expand or collapse

The universe already has a 13.7 billion year evolutionary history from the Big Bang and the release of particles of energy and matter to the formation and evolution of stars and galaxies and the mysterious nature of dark energy and dark matter. Its history determines its ultimate fate in the distant future. A logarithmic timeline of the universe will be necessary to show the details of the early expansion while encompassing the vast time scale to the present and the ultimate future.

Universe

cosmic web

stardust

supernova

dark-matter-day

Milky Way Galaxy

compact-star

exoplanets

Solar System – click to expand or collapse

The five billion year history of the solar system involves the formation and evolution of the Sun, planets, moons, planetesimals, asteroids, comets, interplanetary gas, and dust. Transformations of energy and matter in the interior of the Sun and planets involve gravitational, electromagnetic and nuclear forces. Heat transport may involve thermal conduction, convection, and radiation. A logarithmic timeline best depicts this domain.

Solar System

Sun

Jupiter

Venus TBD

Earth TBD

Moon

 

Earth and geobiosphere – click to expand or collapse

The five billion year history of the Earth and geobiosphere is best depicted by a linear timeline in equal 100 million year intervals depicting Earth's physical, chemical, and biological history including changes at major nodes in Blair Hedges molecular timescales. The timeline highlights the rarely discussed extraordinary events in the Proterozoic era and features plausible natural explanations of the underlying astrophysical, geophysical, biogeochemical, and ecological causes and/or consequences of molecular and metabolic evolution.

The emphasis is on the thermal structure and distribution and flows of energy and matter within the Earth’s lithosphere, hydrosphere, atmosphere, biosphere, as well as the influence of the Sun, the Earth’s deep interior, other planets, and inflows of particles and objects. This domain encompasses the water cycle, carbon and other element cycles, biogeochemical processes, and the origin and evolution of the molecular, metabolic, and structural building blocks of life. Interactions of energy and matter drive microbial ecology, the evolution of complex cells and multicellular organisms, and the origin of kingdoms and phyla.

Earth and Geobiosphere

Global Catastrophes

Ocean Science Quest

Darwin In the Garden

Origin of Life

Diversity of Life TBD

Complexity of Life TBD

virus

bacteria

archaea

eukaryotes

plants

fire

 

 

Brains and Tools – click to expand or collapse

Brains and tools involve the composition, structure, and evolution of neurons and biological and artificial neural networks from the simplest animals to the human brain, their ability to process sensory input and to control motor functions, and the development of tools to analyze, observe, and control the environment and transform the Earth and its lifeforms. A reverse order logarithmic timeline covers the evolutionary history of brains and tools from 3.4 billion year old bacterial membrane proteins that controlled the flow of ions to two billion year old eukaryote cells that generated electrical signals to 600 million year neural networks to complex animal brains to modern machines with exceptional computational powers.

Brains and Tools

 

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